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IMAJ - Colorblind (Official Music Video) featuring Jennifer Lynn

It’s time. Please ‘like’ and share if this touches your heart. “The new #Colorblind isn't about ignoring color. It's about seeing beyond the stereotypes of color, to see each other for who we actually are. It's about seeing the vitality of diversity; in our skin, in our language, our culture, our gender, our faith. There's an intelligence that lies beyond our antiquated fears of one another. That intelligence is LOVE.” —Imaj #YouAreLoved Pre-order The New IMAJ Album “America’s Sweetheart”iTunes: http://smarturl.it/imajonitunesPhysical CD: http://imaj.bandcamp.com Website: http://loveimaj.com#Peace #Love #CountryMusicApple Music iTunes BandcampCMA Country Music AssociationMTV CMT Great American Country

Posted by Imaj on Tuesday, November 10, 2015

"Colorblind" is the first single off of the long anticipated IMAJ sophomore album America's Sweetheart, releasing worldwide on January 5, 2016. IMAJ co-wrote Colorblind with her dear friends multi-platinum songwriter Ron Grimes (most known for his work with LeAnn Rimes) and The Voice of Holland finalist Jennifer Lynn. In the song IMAJ describes a millennial's perspective. She uses color as a metaphor for diversity beyond just skin color. She says the new definition of Colorblind is, "not about ignoring color, it's about seeing beyond the stereotypes of color, to see each other for who we actually are. It's about seeing the vitality of diversity; in our skin, in our language, our culture, our gender, our faith. There's an intelligence that lies beyond our antiquated fears of one another. That intelligence is LOVE." 

Music video concept written, directed and produced by IMAJ and Kassandra Thomas. Edited by IMAJ. Filmed on an iPhone 6 Plus by Sacred Thomas. Makeup and Hair by Bridgett Washington assisted by Mavel Taylor-Hanson. 

What is Colorblind about?

Love, love, love. One side of the spectrum says, "I don't see color." This side means well by what they say, and their goal is to be all-inclusive. But the truth is this side really does see color. They just see it as an obstacle. When something scares us as humans, sometimes we'd rather not see it as it is. So this side of the spectrum most of the time says that they don't see color, when in reality they simply may not want to talk about color.

Then there's the other side that says, "I do see color." They see color as a history, as a culture, a unique way that personifies themselves as individuals but also makes them part of a limited community, a group, or a nation of people. That side of the spectrum wants to talk about diversity, and the terrors of racism, and the beauty of culture.

What we've done with the term "color" is use it as a metaphor, as an umbrella, for all of the things that individualize us as well as bring us together as a human race. We've expanded the limitations of being part of a nation to being part of all of humanity. Because technically there is only one race and that's the human race. That is the mindset of the millennial; we strive to bring together what has been separated, in an effort to right the wrongs, or correct the mistakes, of past generations. We've used the term Colorblind as a segway to create a peaceful dialogue between bothsides of the argument. The side that initially didn't want to talk about it and the side that so desperately needs the other side to listen.

Colorblind brings balance to a subject that often finds itself standing on a steep incline. I think it's vital that we find common ground if we truly want humanity to prosper, as Einstein said, "beyond our technology." Technology is actually what unveiled the corruption and prejudice and racism that had already thoroughly permeated our society for hundreds of years. Our technology brought it out. Let our humanity be the energy that transforms it. 

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Just close your eyes, you’ll see, our hearts are the same you and me. It’s about time to be colorblind.
— IMAJ, Colorblind